Healthy, Definition of healthy, How to Change Your Life by Being Healthier!



Definition of healthy:
1 : free from disease or pain : enjoying health and vigor of body, mind, or spirit : well healthy children tips for staying healthy
2 : showing physical, mental, or emotional well-being : evincing health a healthy complexion has a healthy appetite
3 : beneficial to one's physical, mental, or emotional state : conducive to health healthy foods a healthy lifestyle walk three miles every day … a beastly bore, but healthy
4a : prosperous, flourishing a healthy economy
b : not small or feeble : considerable a healthy sum of money

Choose the Right Synonym for healthy

healthy, sound, wholesome, robust, hale, well mean enjoying or indicative of good health. healthy implies full strength and vigor as well as freedom from signs of disease. a healthy family sound emphasizes the absence of disease, weakness, or malfunction. a sound heart wholesome implies appearance and behavior indicating soundness and balance. a face with a wholesome glow robust implies the opposite of all that is delicate or sickly. a lively, robust little boy hale applies particularly to robustness in old age. still hale at the age of eighty well implies merely freedom from disease or illness. she has never been a well person

Examples of healthy in a Sentence

The company is financially healthy. always a hard worker, Grandma has remained healthy into her 80s 
 
Health care is science or practice directed to diagnosis, treatment, and disease prevention.
In the modern state, health care is integrated into the government-administered and regulated health system; citizens' access to the healthcare system, and hence health care, varies from one country to another.
Depending on each historical stage and on political and economic factors, health care can be more centered on the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, or on their prevention. In the developed world, healthcare systems currently provide care-centered diagnosis and treatment, but this feature is inherited, the philosophy behind systems emerging in the early part of the last century, when factors that primarily affected health were acute and infectious, affecting a young population in a human group with a lower life expectancy. [1] There is, therefore, a mismatch between the means of care offered by current health systems based on advanced and expensive diagnostics and treatment technologies and the problems faced by today's populations, aging and affected by complex chronic diseases. [2] This mismatch translates primarily from the accelerated increase in healthcare system costs in developed countries, where resources are mostly focused on looking for a "magic bullet" for each disease or symptom. [3] In this race against time, not only health care is affected, the economy itself suffers as a result of the concentration of budgetary resources on health and the inherent neglect of the other needs of the communities. [4]
However, most of the chronic diseases affecting the populations of countries where the demographic transition has already occurred can be prevented: obesity, heart disease, a large part of cancers (lung, skin, gastric), diabetes ) are diseases whose prevalence can be influenced by preventive policies. [5] About 40% of premature mortality is due to behavioral factors, another 15% to social factors; modern medicine and the current way of organizing health care, manages to prevent only 10% of premature deaths. [6] Obviously, current health systems are doing well when it comes to prescribing or performing diagnostic and surgical interventions, but they have not yet found the solution to intervene on the upstream determinants of disease, as is poverty or discrimination, that is, unfortunately for the best part of premature mortality. [7] Although there is a colossal amount of scientific literature demonstrating that health differences are determined to the same extent by social circumstances [8] as well as biological processes. [9]
To the extent that the problems of current health care systems are known and the solutions do exist, the question is why modern states continue on a manifestly clogged road, risking bankruptcy? The answer is a lot of political economy and little of the health system management: if it is simple - and extremely profitable (for some) - to file a patent for a medicine, medical device or surgical technique, disease prevention strategies can not not be patented, and from them the world of private entrepreneurs can not take away any money
 
Hygiene tasks as object of study:

1.Igain studies the factors and conditions of the environment (natural and social), which influence the human health, characterizing it qualitatively and quantitatively.

2. Study the laws of the external environment factors on the body and human health, determining the nature of the action and the dependence "dose-time-effect."
 
Sexual hygiene is a discipline that deals with hygiene and health aspects through the prophylactic measures needed to avoid the transmission of diseases in human sexuality. Sexual hygiene is also called intimate hygiene or genital hygiene. It belongs to social and preventive medicine, being part of gynecology. Sexual hygiene deals with body hygiene, contraception, pregnancy, interruption of pregnancy, sexual transmission of infectious diseases of the genitals.
 
With clean hands
The disgust that dirt causes to most people has a long history behind. The reason why this feeling has deeply rooted in the human psyche is not predominantly cultural or historical but biological.Over time, hygiene has been studied from multiple perspectives, and historians and anthropologists have made many white nights to find out why and how certain objects and events come to be classified as dirty and disgusting, and if there is any connection between them and certain diseases, as explained.Restoring the early history of hygiene is difficult, as behaviors are not fossilized. However, our oldest ancestor, common with the cylindrical worms who lived about 590 million years ago, may have been a "hygienic" creature. At least, if we take them as a landmark on the current Caenorhabditis elegans nematode worms that show evidence of a disease-free behavior: with only 302 neurons available, they can detect the presence of the Bacillus thuringiensis pathogen in the environment and il can avoid. Incidentally, the ants are "cleaned": they are feral themselves to get rid of pathogenic fungi and effectively get rid of dead or sick cousins. Most likely, all vertebrates manifest such "snaps"; even the bats are cleaned by ectoparasites, as other mammals, fish and birds do, for the most part.
Do people also have a ... hygiene instinct? After a series of studies throughout the world, British researchers have come to the conclusion that the disgust caused by dirt (common to all people in all cultures) is the form we give the impulse to behave hygienically. According to Valerie Curtis, director of the School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in London, there is a clear link between misery, repulsion, hygiene and disease, but this link precedes science and culture, and precedes even Homo sapiens. Murder and disgust is both instinct and cultural construction, two facets of the natural history of hygiene. Animals equipped with behavioral trends thathave made them avoid objects and events associated with illness have gained an edge in terms of adaptation; hence the success - in the process of natural selection - of genes that favored hygienic behavior.If a hygienic behavior is a natural function of the human psyche, a psychological predisposition being evolved to prevent disease, then the prehistoric man probably behaved hygienically. With difficulty we can make a precise idea about the notion of hygiene in prehistory, but we can guess that in those times it only counts on experience. Those who survived did not just make the right deductions.
it was considered a rare disease, whereas today in countries such as the UK and Australia it affects 20-30% of the population. It has been thought for a while that the boom of allergies has been caused by the invasion of munitions army from the existing dust in homes; until scientists have proven that in fact the number of microbes has diminished for some time now. Atmospheric pollution was another alleged culprit, but today it seems to be blamed. Asthma attacks can be triggered by an improper immune response to irritating particles that reach the lungs, but this does not mean that increased numbers of particles cause more asthma because the condition and other types of allergies are more common widespread in areas where the air is relatively clean rather than high-pollution. The possibility that the lack of dirt could be the cause of allergies was first developed by researchers in 1989. David Strachan, an epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, found that newborns from many families had less chance of becoming sick with asthma or their eczema fever. According to Strachan, the infections transmitted by older siblings are somehow contributing to the protection of small allergens. A heresy, it was said then. But for two years now, other researchers have begun to see the positive side of the microbes. However, at present, some specialists are not convinced of the link between infections and allergies, perhaps because of contradictory evidence. Finally, even if the epidemiological evidence for hygiene hypothesis is questionable, the progress made in understanding the functioning of the immune system gives this theory a certain aura of respectability. In recent years, immunologists supporting the hygiene hypothesis have also discovered the mechanism explains why a clean environment can damage the immune system; the next step is to identify the harmful aspects of excess hygiene. Probably childhood diseases are only partially guilty, some say, while others wonder if much of the responsibility should not be attributed to a change in the microbes living in the human body. Graham Rook, who I have already spoken to, and John Stanford, a bacteriologist at University College London, believe that just the dirt - or rather the type of bacteria it contains - is what saves people with "clean" asthma, hay fever and other allergies. The bacteria involved live in areas with dirty water, not in our body, so it is possible that the different relationship we have with the environment has contributed to changing our contact with them. While in developing countries one liter of water can contain up to one billion microorganisms in the aseptic West, their number is now negligible. "The manic hygienic norms we are currently pursuing are a future step in the opposite direction to the learning process that our immune system absolutely needs," says Stanford. Does that mean we have to re-launch ourselves through mud and drink dirty water? The British scientist does not go that far, because, he admits, hygiene saves many lives, even if some of us have to bear certain consequences; In fact, allergies and immune system diseases are not as dangerous as cholera or leprosy. Lately, the results of some studies make researchers hope to develop vaccines that can prevent asthma and, possibly, other allergic diseases, re-educating the immune system. But if supporters of the hygiene hypothesis are right, introducing a new series of vaccines will not be enough. Fact is said to have been invented in 1872 in a prison. At that time, physicians were already convinced of the benefits of water, but in some cases washing was too expensive - which was a big problem for François-Merry Delabost, the chief physician at the prison in Rouen, who cared for 1,000 prisoners. He had the idea of ​​replacing the bath with a "hot water rain": five minutes and 20 liters of water to wash a prisoner than half an hour and 200 liters for a single bath. The invention of the doctor quickly came out of "coolness", and public baths gradually gave way to bath-showers. Subsequently, as the current water entered the dwellings, the shower was installed at home. The first proof of the existence of soap dates back to 2800 BC. and was discovered after excavations made in the ancient Babylon area. A papyrus found in 1873 by Georg Moritz Ebers and dating back to 1550, i.e. already describes the soap production method used by the Egyptians. This was obtained by mixing animal fats and vegetable oils with a salt called the throne, which came from the Valley of the Nile. Mu
 
The showerIt is said to have been invented in 1872 in a prison. At that time, physicians were already convinced of the benefits of water, but in some cases washing was too expensive - which was a big problem for François-Merry Delabost, the chief physician at the prison in Rouen, who cared for 1,000 prisoners. He had the idea of ​​replacing the bath with a "hot water rain": five minutes and 20 liters of water to wash a prisoner than half an hour and 200 liters for a single bath. The invention of the doctor quickly came out of "coolness", and public baths gradually gave way to bath-showers. Subsequently, as the current water entered the dwellings, the shower was installed at home.
soapThe first testimony of the existence of soap dates back to 2800 BC. and was discovered after excavations made in the ancient Babylon area. A papyrus found in 1873 by Georg Moritz Ebers and dating back to 1550, i.e. already describes the soap production method used by the Egyptians. This was obtained by mixing animal fats and vegetable oils with a salt called the throne, which came from the Valley of the Nile. Many cities today disputed the pride of being Europe's first soap makers: Marseilles, Savona, Gallipoli, Genova. However, in the case of Anglophone populations, soap based on olive oil or other vegetable oils is called Castilia soap, which means it is attributed to a Spanish origin.
bathingTwo hours, this is the time that the Romans used to spend every day in public baths. the exercise, the body's cleaning of the impurities from its contact with the outside, originates in the Oriental rituals and then in the Christian baptism. The Romans gave great importance to "physiological needs". The enormous aqueducts built by them, as well as the sewer system (maximum cloaca) developed in the underground of Rome, remained famous. Fountains, swimming pools, terme (built by the Emperor Diocletian and having a capacity of up to 3,000 people), the latrines with running water were then at the time of the day.One of the most widespread historical errors relates to an alleged perfumed soap factory discovered during the excavations in the city of Pompeii. In reality, the "factory" deals with the processing of mineral substances without any connection with modern soaps. In fact, the Roman ancestors (like the Greeks) did not use soap, but they used scented oils and shrieks to shave off the dirt on their skin.
 
towelThe first reference to cotton fiber comes from Rig Veda, a collection of religious hymns in ancient India, cotton being grown here for more than 3,000 years. The towel, as we know it today, is a fairly recent invention dating back to 1871. Previously, to erase, people used simple pieces of fabric. In fact, from the sixteenth century until the beginning of the eighteenth century, the rubbing of the "visible" parts of the body with the cloth replaced their washing with water.Because of the "illumination" of the time and the Church, the Middle Ages are generally considered a dark period in which hygiene conditions have faded, leading to the spread of many diseases, including some extremely serious, such as typhus and epidemics of plague from the 14th century. The water, which had been an important element of cleansing and hygiene for previous civilizations, became a dangerous enemy during this period. The fact that water makes rotting things has led the teachings of the time to believe that prolonged baths / laundries, opening the pores of the skin, predisposing to diseases and infections. During the Renaissance, there is widespread conviction that a layer of dirt is a good protection against disease. The use of water was not even justifiable for parasite removal: it was normal to have lice and fleas, which were thought to suck the impurities in the blood and fortify the sight. At that time, the richer you are, the more you change your clothes.A white coat turned black was a sign that he had absorbed dirt, so it was no longer necessary to wash.
The shaving machineIn 1901, King Camp Gilette literally changed the face of humanity, inventing the razor blade. For a long time, shaving was a true extreme sport: the soap was ineffective, and the tools used resembled some meat cutters, old and badly sharp.In the seventeenth century, the first razor-worthy machine of this name was invented in England, the famous scarf - a long and sharp blade, as dangerous as a dagger - but which was so difficult to use that it was reserved for barbers only.
ToothbrushInvented by the Chinese in the 15th century, the toothbrush toothbrushcame to Europe two centuries later. | and will gain popularityjust after the Second World War, after the US military disembarked the Old World. They wore a new product in the wounds, "Dr. West's miracle toothbrush", with nylon bristles, easy to produce on a large scale.
 
Bidet siteThis kind of "Garden Dwarf Sink" was born in France in 1710, during the reign of LouisXIVth, to allow gentlemen and maids from the Court to cleanse their "shameful parts" after "gallant appointments" without undressing. A real revolution, after centuries of contact with the body with water had been avoided with obstinacy, perceived as a deadly danger.ASTMUL LA ROMANIby Prof. Florin Mihaltan, President of the Romanian Society of Pneumology
According to the World Health Organization, asthma is responsible annually for about 250,000 deaths worldwide. There are no epidemiological studies in Romania, but the data we hold shows that the prevalence of this disease in children increased from 5 to 7% between 1994-2001, and it is currently estimated that one in 20 children aged school can suffer from asthma. It has a hereditary genetic component, but it is a constantly evolving disease.A major problem we face is that, compared to the results of similar studies in other countries, asthma appears to be much underdiagnosed in Romania.Immature maturation and first-year exposure to infection are important factors influencing the risk of asthma in a genetically predisposed person.Asthma is more common in the rich and poor population and is explained by differences in lifestyle, exposure to allergens, and access to medical services.
The Hygiene Hypothesis suggests that exposure to first-year infections (exposure due to hygiene) influences the development of the immune system in children in a non-allergic way, which corresponds to a reduced risk of developing asthma and other allergic diseases.Although this hypothesis is currently in the study, the mechanism it describes can explain the associations between family size, birth order, daily care and asthma risk.Finally, it is important that the patient adhere to the doctor's advice, because the disease has an obvious allergic component, which can be influenced by hygiene and even diet. In Romania, the particularity is represented by the fact that the patient comes to a late doctor when he suffocates; especially patients with low levels of education are reluctant, and if they do not come to us, we can not even speak of disease control.Beyond technology, hospitals, funding, information remains one of the most important resources in medicine.Released on February 14, 2008, the Updated Asthma Management Guide is the first specialized tool in this issue that has ever been introduced in the medical market in Romania.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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